Author Archive: MBWG

Park After Dark

img_7053MBWG members hosted a ‘chiroptophobia’ booth at the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science’s ‘Park After Dark’ event on Friday, October 28.  Participants trick-or-treated throughout the museum and learned about the science behind their fears through fun games, challenges, and hands-on exploration stations.  Museum staff and volunteers hosted 2,574 kids and adults at this annual event. (Photo courtesy of Mississippi Museum of Natural Science.)

Wildlife Outdoor Learning Festival at Noxubee NWR

MBWG hosted a booth at Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge’s WOLF (Wildlife Outdoor Learning) Festival on September 24.  Families, scout troops, and others from the community came out to the event and learned about Mississippi’s native wildlife.  The MBWG booth featured an informational display along with a mist netting activity where kids could participate in a mock mist-net event.  Catching plastic bats, weighing, measuring, and releasing them gave participants an opportunity to learn about Mississippi’s bats and how biologists study them.

13th Annual MBWG Mist Net Event

The Mississippi Bat Working Group met in Grenada, MS for two nights of mist netting on September 20-21, 2016.  Twenty three biologists, teachers, and other bat enthusiasts netted at Malmaison Wildlife Management Area and Tallahatchie National Wildlife Refuge in Tallahatchie County, covering four sites each night. A total of 32 bats representing three species were netted over the course of the event.  We’d like to thank all of the people who came out to net and make our 13th mist net event a successful one!   (more…)

Third Annual Multi-State Bat Blitz

Rafinesque's big-eared bat Photo: Kathy Shelton

Photo: Kathy Shelton

The Southeastern Bat Diversity Network’s “Multi-State Bat Blitz” will be held from August 24-31, 2016.  The Blitz is a five-day window in the early fall where people throughout the Southeastern United States mist net in as many locations in each state as possible.  The Bat Blitz is a great opportunity to not only collect more information on Mississippi’s bats, it is also a great outreach opportunity where members can invite the general public to learn more about bats and their conservation.    Read more

 

 

The Amazing World of Bats

Chester Martin, founder of the MBWG, explained the unique adaptations of bats for survival in a nocturnal world with a program entitled “The Amazing World of Bats” at the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science. The event was well attended, with 120 participants including children and adults.  The program included a question and answer session covering a wide range of topics.

Trace Festival

On April 16, 2016, Becky Rosamond hosted a bat booth at the Trace Festival, hosted by the National Park Service’s Natchez Trace Parkway in Tupelo, MS.  The event included a mist net demonstration and several bats were captured and released.

14th Annual Meeting

On February 4, 2016, the Mississippi Bat Working Group met at the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science in Jackson, MS for their annual membership and business meeting.  Research and monitoring updates were presented by Cody Jordan and Dr. Rich Buccholz (University of Mississippi), Scott Veum (Mississippi State University), Kathy Shelton (Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks), Alison McCartney (Deep South Eco Group), Chester Martin, Becky Rosamond (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service), Kris Godwin (USDA-APHIS Wildlife Services), Shea Staten (US Army Corps of Engineers), and James Austin (US Fish and Wildlife Service).

12th Annual MBWG Mist Net Event

Mist Net 2015The Mississippi Bat Working Group converged on Delta National Forest on October 19-20, 2015 for two nights of mist netting in the Mississippi Delta.  A total of eight sites were netted, covering both the north and south end of the forest.  Habitats netted included open water (drying ponds), drainages, and areas adjacent to oxbow lakes.  Fifty-five bats representing six species were captured. Species included evening bat (40), southeastern bat (4), eastern red bat (3), big brown bat (2), Rafinesque’s big-eared bat (1), and eastern pipistrelle (tricolored bat; 1).  (Photo: Becky Rosamond).